Welcome back to another year of best practice advice, route tips and industry news from Live Fast, Die Old. Last year we kicked off our stunning Breathtaking Roads campaign and shared three of our favourite routes in coastal, forest and mountain regions. Who could forget…?

This year we’re back to share even more exciting content that celebrates the beauty of biking in Scotland.

Recently we caught up with some members of Evolution Women’s MCC (EWMCC) to chat about the thrill of group riding as well as some really good advice on how to enjoy the road with fellow bikers and friends safely. Here’s what they’ve got to say.

Why do you ride as part of a group?

Group riding gives the sense of safety in numbers, particularly when riding on some very rural roads, it also makes for good memories that everyone can share as they have all experienced the same as you at the same time. A number of us have completed advanced riding courses so it’s good to see these skills replicated by others in the group as well.

Why is riding as part of a group exciting?

It’s quite a spectacle seeing everyone in formation and all enjoying the routes together, when we stop off at cafes and arrive at our destination we attract a lot of attention as people don’t usually see that many women bikers at the one time.

What safety measures do you have to consider when riding with others?

You have to take in to consideration that not everyone will have the same riding experience, therefore be aware of riders who are new to group riding. On straight sections of the road try and adopt the staggered formation to get a better view of the road ahead. When an overtake is on remember that the rider in front has a different view to rider behind, never follow anyone on an overtake until the person in front has completed their manoeuvre and never follow anyone unless you have assessed that the overtake is safe for yourself.

Where’s your favourite area in Scotland to explore on two wheels and why?

Our member Jayne is the ambassador for the LFDO coastal route so our first choice would be the Ardnamurchan Loop, which takes you out to the most Westerly point of mainland Scotland – the tight twisting single track B-road that snakes along the coastline is rewarded at the end by stunning view over to Coll. You can sit and watch the waves crash over the rocks whilst having coffee and cake in the Lighthouse café. There’s also the chance of spotting whales, dolphins and porpoise, which can often be seen from Sanna Point and the lighthouse. Red Squirrel, Roe Deer, Scottish Wildcat can also be spotted in their natural habitat.

What plans do you have with your group for throughout 2019?

Group riding gives the sense of safety in numbers, particularly when riding on some very rural roads, it also makes for good memories that everyone can share as they have all experienced the same as you at the same time. A number of us have completed advanced riding courses so it’s good to see these skills replicated by others in the group as well.

Why do you ride as part of a group?

We recently completed a ride out on 4th May to highlight International Female Rider Day from Dundee to Aberdeen to celebrate female riders from all over the world. There’s also a regular women only event with i2i motorcycle academy in York which we will be attending at the end of May. We’re looking forward to our very 1st Annual Adventure in the beginning of August where members from all over the UK will congregate to enjoy some ride outs and socialising. A key event that we’re involved with organising is the motorcycle parades for Glasgow Children’s Hospital and Erskine veterans hospital – quite a few of the girls from the club assist with marshalling at the events as well as dressing up for the children which is a good laugh.

Finally, why is it so important to be aware of the whole group when out on the road?

Check who’s behind you regularly, as by far the most important thing to remember when riding in a group, is to check your mirrors from time to time to see whether the riders behind you are still there. If nobody is behind you this could mean a number if things:

  1. Something has happened to another rider.
  2. The pace of the lead rider is unsuitable for the experience of following riders.

Always be aware of your surroundings. When parking up, make sure that there is enough space for the size of the group and that the road condition is appropriate for motorcycles.

Evolution Women's MCC

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